Facilities Workshop

2007 Planning Facilities for Undergraduate Science & Mathematics Workshop

March 16 - 18, 2007

Planning Facilities for Undergraduate Science, Engineering & Mathematics
Westfields Marriott Washington Dulles
- near the Washington Dulles International Airport -
Chantilly, Virginia
March 16 - 18, 2007

As with past PKAL facilities workshops, this event is planned as a forum for academic leaders contemplating facilities renewal on their campus. Participants will examine the relationship between space and program and explore how new directions in science and technology call for new kinds of spaces for the learning and practice of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Institutional teams are desired, with faculty from involved departments and administrators with responsibility for budget, facilities, information technologies, and other offices whose decisions affect the quality of new spaces. They will learn from and work with architects and with academics with recent experience in facilities planning; the objective is to work through the weekend to shape an action agenda for planning new spaces for science that will serve their institution with distinction over the long-term.

In plenary and break-out sessions, participating teams will consider some of the driving issues currently facing science faculty, their administrative colleagues, and design professionals in planning the STEM facility of the future.

Research— how to design spaces that:

  • accommodate the continuing evolution of science, particularly the interdisciplinary collaboration that is becoming commonplace, which calls for new kinds of research clusters, for support infrastructure with minimal fixed physical elements, for communal social spaces for the serendipitous exchange of ideas; spaces that allow for such collaborations while maintaining traditional disciplinary groups as necessary
  • facilitate the integration of research and education at the undergraduate level, and the building of a research community
  • support the use of the sophisticated instrumentation required to do 21st century science, and the technologies that enable research communities to work, 24/7, with colleagues around the world.

Pedagogies— how to design spaces that:

  • accommodate introductory courses designed around contemporary "inquiry-based" pedagogies
  • reflect contemporary research in cognitive science- how students learn and how faculty teach
  • allow the collaborative, problem-solving group work that characterizes the strong undergraduate STEM program of today
  • enable teachers to make the most effective use of information technologies to strengthen student learning.

Institutional issues— how to design a facility that:

  • incorporates sustainability in its concept, sitting, orientation, design, construction and operation, that results in cost-effectiveness over the long-term, and that is itself a laboratory for science
  • does not become obsolete as new directions in science and technology (and/or new pedagogies) emerge, but is rather itself a catalyst for continual renewal of program
  • is a welcoming destination for members of their campus community, a place for recognizing and celebrating the role of science and technology in our world today
  • signals the value that the college or university places on research, learning and teaching in STEM fields.

Logistics

Resources

Cranbrook Jigsaw Group C: The Science Building of the Future
Understanding Key Questions
After more than a decade of significant activity in imagining, planning, constructing, and using new spaces for natural science communities on our nation’s campuses, it seemed prudent to step back, to ask if old questions are still relevant and what new questions are emerging. It seemed equally important to begin to gather thoughts of architects and other reflective practitioners from the design professional world about questions for the future.

Presentations

Breakout IB: Renovations, Additions & New Construction
Reporting Out
Michael J. Reagan
Breakout IC & II A: Sustainability
Michael C. Lauber, Jeffery T. Niesen
Breakout ID: The Dickinson College Story
Reporting Out
Walter Chromiak, Dusty Rhoads
Breakout IE: The University of Notre Dame Story
Reporting Out
Steven W. Ansel, Dennis C. Jacobs
Breakout IIB: Classrooms
Reporting Out
Steven W. Ansel, Michael J. Reagan
Breakout IID: University of Richmond Story
Reporting Out
Betsy S. Curtler, Andrew Newcomb
Breakout IID: University of Richmond Story (2)
Reporting Out
Betsy S. Curtler, Charles J. Kirby, Andrew Newcomb
Breakout IIE: Winona State University Story
Reporting Out
Nancy Jannik, Gary C. McNay
Breakout IIIB: Campus Aesthetics
Reporting Out
James W. Baird, Andrew Newcomb
Breakout IIID: Flexibility & Adaptability
Reporting Out
Richard M. Heinz, Dusty Rhoads
Breakout IIIE: Budgets
Reporting Out
William Gustafson, Gary C. McNay
Plenary I: Getting the Vision Right
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum
Plenary II: The MIT Story
Reporting Out
Steve Imrich, Phillip D. Long
Plenary III: Snapshots of STEM Facilities
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum
Plenary IV: Alternatives for Lab Design
Reporting Out
Kenneth G. DeBoer, Richard M. Heinz
Plenary V: Case Study
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum
Plenary VI: The Culture & Context of 21st Century Spaces
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum

Audio Recordings

Plenary I: Getting the People Right (Audio)
Reporting Out
Walter Chromiak, Nancy Jannik, Phillip D. Long
Plenary II: The MIT Story (Audio)
Reporting Out
Steve Imrich, Phillip D. Long
Plenary III: Snapshots of STEM Facilities (Audio)
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum
Plenary V: Case Study (Audio)
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum
Plenary VI: The Culture & Context of 21st Century Spaces (Audio)
Reporting Out - Jeanne L. Narum

Related Pages

Making the Case: The Imperative for New Spaces for Science
from the 2007 PKAL Facilities Planning Workshop
Becoming an effective advocate for building and sustaining a robust undergraduate learning environment takes an intentional, creative, persistent, and collective effort, whether the focus is on the quality and character of space or program.